Raw Honey

Honey, Spoon, Food

RAW HONEY

Honey contains about 200 substances, including amino acids, vitamins, minerals and enzymes, has bactericidal activity against many microorganisms, accelerates wound healing, has anti-inflammatory and protective effect on gastrointestinal infections caused by bacteria and rotavirus. Honey has been commonly used for treating wounds before the advent of antibiotics but even today, despite the variety of existing antibiotic creams, in some cases, honey may be more effective in treating poorly healing wounds that resist to conventional treatments. By removing moisture from the wound through its high sugar content, honey inhibits bacterial growth and proliferation and blocks the passage of harmful external contaminants. And, as is inexpensive, can be the ideal choice in countries without access to modern medicines for the treatment of wounds. Studies have shown that burns covered with honey heal faster and with less pain and scarring than the burns treated with conventional medicines. There are already on the market curative solutions honey-based for wound care.

Herb – Lamb’s Quarters

LAMB’S QUARTERS – CHENOPODIUM ALBUM

lambs quarters picture   lambs quarters seeds

Actions: Nutritious

Description:  Lamb’s Quarter is primarily used as a nutritious edible plant. It has also been used internally and externally as a wash to treat painful limbs.

Lamb’s Quarters is a closer relative of spinach.  It has more calcium than other vegetables and more vitamin C and A than spinach.  It also has a good amount of iron and potassium among other vitamins and minerals.

Lamb’s quarter thrives as a common weed in gardens, near streams, rivers, forest clearings, waste places and pretty much anywhere. It is very hardy common weed and grows in many areas throughout Canada, US, Europe and parts of Asia.

Annual plant that looks dusty from a distance due to a white coating on the leaves, and when moist, water simply beads and runs off. It produces tiny green flowers that form in clusters on top of spikes.

Edible parts: Leaves, shoots, seeds, flowers. Saponins in the seeds are potentially toxic and should not be consumed in excess. Lamb’s quarters contain some oxalic acid therefore when eating this raw, small quantities are recommended. Cooking removes this acid. Lamb’s quarter can be eaten in salads or added to smoothies and juices. Steaming this edible weed is one method of cooking, or can be added to soups, sautés and much more. Drying this wild edible is one way to add this nutritious plant to your meals throughout the winter or you can blanch and freeze the leaves.

PREVENTION ~ FIRST DEFENSE